July 19, 2014   23,237 notes

accioslothsplease:

JK Rowling’s new update about Harry, Ron, Hermione, and friends.

(via the-ballad-of-peter-pettigrew)

July 19, 2014   63,353 notes
hatepotion:


'You could've taken anyone!’ said Ron in disbelief over dinner. ‘Anyone! And you chose Loony Lovegood?’
'Don't call her that, Ron,' snapped Ginny, pausing behind Harry on her way to join friends. 'I'm really glad you're taking her, Harry, she's so excited.'

as always, who is sentimental about their friendship? Not me, of course

hatepotion:

'You could've taken anyone!’ said Ron in disbelief over dinner. ‘Anyone! And you chose Loony Lovegood?’

'Don't call her that, Ron,' snapped Ginny, pausing behind Harry on her way to join friends. 'I'm really glad you're taking her, Harry, she's so excited.'

as always, who is sentimental about their friendship? Not me, of course

(via the-ballad-of-peter-pettigrew)

July 19, 2014   1,044,671 notes

butterbeerbarista:

the-ballad-of-peter-pettigrew:

(Sirius Black at 2am in the Gryffindor dormitory)

marksmaster

Oh my fuck.

(Source: adrianivashkov)

July 19, 2014   78,061 notes

“ See, Rowling largely operates Harry’s generation in a clear system of parallels to the previous generation, Marauders and all. Harry is his father—Quidditch star, a little pig-headed sometimes, an excellent leader. Ron is Sirius Black—snarky and fun, loyal to a fault, mired in self-doubts. Hermione is Remus Lupin—book smart and meticulous, always level-headed, unfailingly perceptive. Ginny is Lily Evans—a firecracker, clever and kind, unwilling to take excuses. Draco Malfoy is Severus Snape—a natural foil to Harry, pretentious, possessed of the frailest ego and also deeper sense of right and wrong when it counts. And guess what? Neville Longbottom is Peter Pettigrew.

Neville is a perfect example of how one single ingredient in the recipe can either ruin your casserole (or stew, or treacle tart, whatever you like), or utterly perfect your whole dish. Neville is the tide-turner, the shiny hinge. And all because he happens to be in the same position as Wormtail… but makes all the hard choices that Pettigrew refused the first time around. Other characters are in similar positions, but none of them go so far as Neville. None of them prove that the shaping of destiny is all on the individual the way he does. ”

Emily Asher-Perren (via margaerystyrells)

Interesting take on the text. marksmaster and I should record this discussion when we have it for fandomphd.

(via butterbeerbarista)

I see that in some ways, but I think Sirius and Ron are only superficially similar. All in all, the challenges they’ve faced growing up are vastly different. Same with Remus and Hermione. In both cases, I feel like the Marauders had the grinding, every-day battles that they dealt with, while Ron and Hermione at least had the safe fallback of their families’ love and acceptance as a cushion. Sirius had more money than Ron, but far less love. Remus was more daring than Hermione, but far less accepted by wizarding society as a whole, whereas she only had to deal with those who didn’t like muggle-born witches. As a consequence, I think, she was a lot braver—she knew telling off Ron and Harry wouldn’t destroy their friendship, so she didn’t let them get out of hand. Remus, on the other hand, shrunk away from telling James and Sirius to stop being idiotic bullies. So a couple of fascinating fundamental character differences that definitely swung the tide. Harry and James, too, didn’t share similar histories.

On the other hand, Hermione and Ron had wakeup calls far earlier on in the magnitude of danger they faced fighting Voldemort (at least, as far as we know of the Marauders’ lives). The Marauders were, in that way, less mature than the trio because they literally went looking for trouble and adventure.

I do agree that there were parallels, though. There was even a moment when Harry compared pensieve Pettigrew to Neville. But you get the difference between them right away, in the first book, where Neville stands up to the trio as they’re trying to sneak out. It’s far harder to stand up to your friends than your enemies, and Neville makes those hard choices.

The great thing is, it all comes down to love. Who was loved, by whom, and how does it affect who they are.

Except Neville and Pettigrew. Both grew up raised by solitary women, obviously cared for, even if they weren’t necessarily treated with the greatest respect. I think, though, Neville is selfless, whereas Peter was selfish. Peter hid behind his bigger friends, used them for protection and status. Neville stood up to anyone when he felt he should, no matter how afraid or outmatched he was.

Clearly, Fandom PhD needs to happen this weekend.

(Source: nathanielstuart, via butterbeerbarista)

July 19, 2014   6 notes
Don’t #hailpiedra! Eye-P.I.E.! #agentsofshield @chloebennet4 @imbrettdalton @clarkgregg

Don’t #hailpiedra! Eye-P.I.E.! #agentsofshield @chloebennet4 @imbrettdalton @clarkgregg

July 17, 2014   2 notes

asidefromthenorm said: Okay, so, I haven't written in my book for over a month. It's not like writers block, it's just... no accountability? Ugh. Any ideas?

I have to make schedules like the ones I’m posting. The big thing is, don’t overwhelm yourself. I had to learn what my writing pace was, what my audio recording pace was, and what I could handle in a single month. It works well to sort of write out a schedule for yourself and then monitor what you can do in a given week. Give yourself time off. Don’t overwork your brain. If you’re tired, respect that. I believe you have to take care of yourself before you can create good art.

If you’re down to listen to podcasts, Mur Lafferty’s “I Should be Writing” and Brandon Sanderson’s “Writing Excuses” are good for motivation and helping you feel less alone.

Basically, i have to become super type-a in order to get all the crap I want to do accomplished. Since I’m looking at writing and audio as careers (in addition to what I’m going back to school for), I’m forcing myself to be more rigorous.

The most important thing you can do is figure out what your long-term goal is. I highly recommend listening to Get It Done Guy’s podcast on Life Maps, because it will help you figure out the goals and seriously helps to take the pressure off.

If you really just want some good productivity tools, I like the Pomodoro Technique, and I am currently loving a program called Write or Die. Try both of those and see if they help you out!

July 17, 2014   1 note
Rough schedule for next year, with penciled-in thoughts for when I will work on certain projects. Given school, the timeline may change, so pencil is good at this point.

Rough schedule for next year, with penciled-in thoughts for when I will work on certain projects. Given school, the timeline may change, so pencil is good at this point.

July 17, 2014
Keep track of things I want to do but can’t fit into this year.

Keep track of things I want to do but can’t fit into this year.

July 17, 2014   1 note
This is what a month looks like on task-level, provided there are no long audiobooks. #writing #productivity

This is what a month looks like on task-level, provided there are no long audiobooks. #writing #productivity

July 17, 2014
Day and time scheduling process. There’s also a macro-level look at the year on the right with major projects written in red. #writing #productivity

Day and time scheduling process. There’s also a macro-level look at the year on the right with major projects written in red. #writing #productivity